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Cape Cod, United States
__I see with young eyes, an old mirror. Here, I hope to offer... as I see.

Saturday, April 17, 2010

__The Nemaskets, a clan of the Wampanoags, used the phrase -the moon of leaves- and that, it is said, was the month of June; perhaps it was a reference to the first spouts of Mondomin, or corn.
__Now, the tree leaves become full during the first week of May, and May's moon I see as "this moon of leaves." An entry in my scribble book, from last May.


warm night
this moon of leaves...
pond frogs


15 comments:

TALON said...

"moon of leaves" - so evocative and so pretty!

John McDonald said...

yes an evocative one M
john

Rachel said...

Lieber Magyar,

eine ganze Geschichte könnte man sich aus deinen wenigen, wundervollen Worten zaubern...

herzlichst, Rachel

Lorraine said...

you inspire me to feel more, I like that

Cindybrown said...

I love the moon of leaves, it has such peace about it...

Ralf Bröker said...

I can hear them. The rustle and the croaking - after this long time of cold silence.

Best wishes
Ralf

old pajamas said...

Magyar,

Captures and coveys with grace your 'warm night'. Thank you.....pajamas

Nana Fredua-Agyeman said...

this is beautiful. the 'moon of leaves'

Frank Williams said...

Super post, Magyar. I too love the line "this moon of leaves"...

Crafty Green Poet said...

I love those types of names for the moon, they evoke a connection with the seasons that we mostly are losing

lovely haiku too

fourwindshaiga said...

Lovely, and so fitting.

I was wondering today, while out walking if there was a moon for the ferns unfurling.

Magyar said...

Friends... I thank you all, for your visits and gracious comments! _m

T.Migratorius said...

And I believe the Ojibway called May "blossom moon".

floating
on a lilly pad
blossom moon

Really Magyar, a wonderful haibun.

Tikkis said...

Interesting text. (I have tried to search some Indian texts, but not so many of those left perhaps.
Some in American Poetry, The Nineteenth Century Vol Two.)
Also some translations, in fact quite many. ...

--moon of leaves --

great!

full moon & the pond --
the frog croaking
with it's portrait


Ps. Who is Mondomin, or what? My Webster claims there is none?

Magyar said...

Tikkis,
__I casually study the American Natives. Mon-do-min is a charactor of a Nemasket legend... on his grave grew the first maize... or corn as it is now called.
__Plausible resources... Russel's history, "Indian New England Before the Mayflower" or
Weston's "History of Middleboro."

Terry
__The natives were NOT the primitive savages they had been referred to... centered so in nature, their lives were poetic.

...and I thank you both for your commants, and your fine haiku are welcom additions! _m