My photo
Cape Cod, United States
__I see with young eyes, an old mirror. Here, I hope to offer... as I see.

Thursday, March 17, 2011



clover stem
spun between my fingers
hope turns


windmill
this lamp in the dark
snow spins

15 comments:

Devika said...

Happy St,Partick's Day Magyar...good sets!:)

so now windmill spins snow? that's interesting,

wishes,
devika

TALON said...

Happy St. Patrick's Day, D!

Hope is a beacon, isn't it?

Frank... said...

An evocative pair, Magyar...

sandy said...

Happy St. Pat's Day!
I love your hopeful poems.

joo said...

Happy St Patric's my friend!
Lovely poem, as usually:)

Magyar said...

__I thank you my friends!

When does haiku become sedoka?
__I'm afraid I don't have the intellect that could form an opinion with which all would agree, yet, if this pair were joined... since they do relate... I'd call them sedoka.
__They refere to this day, and the ongoing struggles of our Japanese friends; 'hope,' and a viable
-ancient- power source that
'spins' modern technologies to light this lamp in the dark.
_m

Janice Thomson said...

Hope that light spreads first to a couple certain reactors...their world will never be the same but let them have hope for each new day. Wonderful set Magyar...

Lorraine said...

beautiful, but it's just spinning out now, please don't let it show

Gillena Cox said...

nice set; timely, relevant, profound, inspiring; Hope you had a nice day; much love...

Ashi said...

Likeyour windmill Magyar, they are also working on wave-power plants here in Denmark, so maybe soon we can get rid off atomic power and oil, that will be the day :)

John McDonald said...

nice set M
john

Judie said...

Thanks for the comment on my post!!!! I always loved to pick clover in the spring and make clover chains. It made me feel like summer was right around the corner.

Crafty Green Poet said...

These two complement each other perfectly!

Pranavam Ravikumar a.k.a. Kochuravi said...

Nice one!

Tikkis said...

Interesting. Why not sedoka. In Japan did they count it as a song, and 5-7-7-5-7-7 which is much more easier in Japanese?

When put in English it's no more a (short) song anymore but a biginning for a short novel? :-)

But very often also I wonder whether one three-liner (sometimes a haiku, senryu) is enough alone, or should it need sometihing, a fellow text.

Sedoka is a good answer, perhaps. Or just a haiku beginning a new renga? Hokku. or a senryu, or a zenryu as my friend once put. ;-)